Table of Contents

Prevention of workplace violence in ED nursing using the implementation of an educational program and a new reporting tool

Published on: 7th January, 2022

The Emergency Department (ED) is a place that regularly deals with acute scenarios and people that are generally sensitive in nature. In a fast-paced environment such as this, people can be emotionally charged and react in different ways. Unfortunately, nurses in the ED tend to be most affected. Literature shows that workplace violence incidents that occur tend to involve ED nurses. Furthermore, ED nurses are more inclined to have an attitude that makes them think that any acts of transgression are “part of the job” and incidents usually go underreported. Moreover, reporting tools are usually difficult to use and tend to be a barrier to reporting workplace violence. In this evidence-based project, ED nurses will participate in an educational prevention program that will help equip them with the knowledge and awareness that is needed to decrease the incidence of workplace violence. Furthermore, a new, easy-to-use reporting tool will be implemented for ED staff. An implementation of an easier reporting tool and an education prevention program on the incidence of workplace violence will help reduce the number of future incidents of workplace violence. The purpose of this evidence-based project is to create a “zero tolerance” workplace culture for ED nurses that ultimately decreases the incidence of workplace violence. Based on research, an educational program and new reporting tool will be implemented at an urban community hospital in Westchester. Included is a purpose statement, and operational and conceptual definition, PICO questions, and an evidence-based practice protocol for workplace violence.
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SARS-CoV-2, the emperor’s new clothes and medical tyranny

Published on: 10th March, 2022

SARS-CoV-2 revisits a children’s fairy tale, the Emperor’s New Clothes. The swindler- salesmen are Biden, Fauci, et al. The magical clothes are their deliberate “pandemic of fear,” and the duped emperor is the American public.Extensive evidence is presented here of a great scam. The data details the true and low health risks of SARS-CoV-2; viral biology of natural immunity and the immune response from experimental mRNA gene therapy; side effects of the “jab;” and the draconian consequences of federal mandates. Differences between official pronouncements and scientific data are highlighted.The goal of the SARS-CoV-2 Big Con or scam is the nullification of the U.S. Bill of Rights in order to restore tyranny over the American public. We the People can fight for freedom with ballots and dollars.
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Personal and academic factors of stress in nursing students during clinical practices in the context of COVID-19

Published on: 23rd March, 2022

In the year 2020, COVID-19 spread globally. The increase in cases and deaths has created problems such as stress, anxiety, and depression in health workers.The health care workers (inclusive of students in professional practices are vulnerable to psychiatric pathology due to their exposure to the virus, their increased risk of contagion and even death, overload of functions, pressure for decision-making, the close experience of patients, relatives, and colleagues’ pain, and the requirement to function at the top of capacity.The objective of this research is to analyse the personal and academic factors of stress development in nursing students, during clinical practices in the COVID-19 context.It is a cases and controls study, with 154 students who attended clinical practices during the period of May-August 2020. High levels of stress were found in 61% of students, 34 of these had difficulties concentrating (OR: 3.08), 64 participants reported fear of contact with COVID-19 patients, (OR: 1.9) and 68 participants were identified with inadequate knowledge of COVID-19 transmission (OR: 1.5).The study found that the transition to virtual classes as a strategy to reduce contagion increases three times the possibilities of developing stress, another variable that doubles the risk of stress is the fear of caring for a patient with COVID-19 who has not been diagnosed.
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